Monday, September 19, 2016

Sunday Spotlight: Haori

Esty
Okay, so I can't stop looking at Japanese traditional clothing. You all know I love studying clothing from the past, whether its 18th century stays or Victorian bustle gowns, I just love historical and vintage clothes. This interest does not end with western clothing. and I have long been fascinated with Kimono and the layers, belts, and accessories worn with them. While studying at CSU I was even able to study some obi and kimono up close, as the Avenir Museum collection has a very large number of kimono and other Japanese items. What I wouldn't give to go back up there and study them some more!

So today, instead of getting into the conversation about cultural exchange in clothing design, or cultural appropriation, or whether or not westerners should/can wear Japanese traditional clothing (as this is something I want to A) do more research on & B) an entire dedicated post about), lets simply admire some beautiful haori. What are haori? They are short lightweight jacket like garments worn over kimono by both men and women. They are shaped and constructed similarly to kimono, but are worn open in the front as opposed to crossed and are tied with short cords called himo. Many people wear them today with modern clothing underneath, though they are very different from those flimsy "kimono" robes/cardigans that every shop is selling right now! Those poly chiffon shawls are nothing compared to the real deal, so lets skip Forever 21's interpretation and go straight to the source...

Womans Haori, Late 30s- Early 40s, MFA
Woman's Haori, First half of 20th century, MFA
Woman's Haori, First half of 20th century, MFA
Woman's Haori, first half of 20th century, MFA
Woman's Haori, First half of 20th century, MFA
Woman's Silk Haori
Woman's Silk Haori
Woman's Haori, Etsy
Woman's Haori, Etsy
Silk Haori, Pre-WWII, Ichiroya
 Women's Haori differ from men's in four main ways: the men's versions are slightly longer, the sleeves of men's haori are connected completely at the side seam (the women's haori sleeves are open for much of the side seam, as is some of the side seam at the underarm itself as can be seen of the haori pictured above), by the linings, and most obviously by color. Men's haori (and kimono) are most often made in more subdued colors and patterns whereas women's clothing is usually more colorful, especially for younger unmarried women. The linings of men's haori are often pictorial to the point of being essentially wearable artwork! Solid black is considered very formal in Japanese traditional clothing, and the men's haori below would be the most formal kind as it has five mon, the round white designs on the front and back (which are family crests). I just might do a few more posts all about kimono soon as the subject is very interesting and the clothing very beautiful!



Is this a good time to mention I've bought a vintage woman's style haori for my collection? I couldn't resist, though I'm not sure I'd be comfortable wearing it! More on that later though. Have any of you ever studied clothing from another culture before?


8 comments:

  1. I'm hugely intrigued by oriental clothing and I recently bought a gorgeous vintage yukata (a summer kimono) and hanhaba obi to wear as loungewear at home. I did a lot of research into the correct way of wearing them and it's absolutely fascinating how it all comes together. I'm so chuffed I bought them, they're both so stunning. xx

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    1. Oh I am jealous, I want a yukata! I have bought a haori...okay I have recently bought 3 haori! Opps! The finest is black with big yellow oak leaves all over it and I adore it so much! I'm glad I'm not alone in my fascination :)

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  2. I love, love kimonos. I lived in Japan for 5 years and took lessons on how to properly garb myself in these lovely clothes. I brought so many lovely pieces home with me, they stay packed away most of the time, but I sometimes pull them out and dress in them at home. To me they are 懐かしい (natsukashii), which kind of means 'a reminiscence'. I wish I could wear them out and about here in the States.

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    1. Goodness I'd love to spend that much time in such a beautiful country! How wonderful that you have a collection of Japanese clothing, I'd wear it around the house all the time too if I were you :)

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  3. What a lovely, informative post, sweet dear. It's awesomely exciting that you've purchased a ladies haori for your own collection. Congratulations!

    xoxo ♥ Jessica

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  4. Beautiful garments, those fabrics are stunning.

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    1. I quite agree! It's pretty difficult to not start collecting them ;)

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